Pakistani artist Anila Quayyum Agha’s Intersections uses a 6.5ft laser-cut wooden cube to cast amazing shadow art in the room which holds it — with just a single light bulb. The installation in Grand Rapids, Michigan explores the intricate geometrical patterns found in Islamic sacred spaces in a dynamic interplay between shadow and light.

Intersections examines the sense of wonder and exclusion she felt while growing up in Pakistan. “The wooden frieze emulates a pattern from the Alhambra, which was poised at the intersection of history, culture and art and was a place where Islamic and Western discourses, met and co-existed in harmony and served as a testament to the symbiosis of difference,” she explains.“For me the familiarity of the space visited at the Alhambra Palace and the memories of another time and place from my past, coalesced in creating this project.”


 

Islamic sacred spaces
Image Credit: Sarah’s Throne
laser-cut wooden cube
Image Credit: Grand Rapids Art Museum
shadow art
Image Credit: Art Prize
Anila Quayyum Agha Intersections
Image Credit: Art Prize
cube casts shadows with light bulb
Image Credit: Art Prize

 

Islamic sacred spaces
Image Credit: Carol Lautenbach / Grand Rapids Art Museum
laser-cut wooden cube
Image Credit: Grand Rapids Art Museum
shadow art
Image Credit: Anila Quayyum Agha (left), Art Prize (right)
Anila Quayyum Agha Intersections
Image Credit: Anila Quayyum Agha

cube casts shadows with light bulb

 

 

via:cubebreaker.com

 

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