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Ezra H. Murray for Art-Sheep

The swastika, also known as the gammadion cross, is one of those things in life that are greatly misunderstood. A decorative element in various cultures since at least the Neolithic era, the swastika is a very sacred symbol of auspiciousness and good luck in Indian culture and religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Janaism.

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Back in the early 20th century, the swastika was widely used in Europe, in an effort to adopt the Indian point of view in matters of spirituality. When the Nazi Party was formed in Germany in 1920, first under the leadership of Anton Drexler (1920-1921) and then by Adolf Hitler (1921-1945), the swastika was made its symbol. Ever since it is largely associated with the Nazi Germany and white supremacy in most Western countries. Hitler’s Nazis have rendered this still sacred in eastern cultures symbol as a sign of hatred and evil.
The word “swastika” derives from the Sanskrit svastika “lucky or auspicious object”. The older term “gammadion cross” derives mainly from its appearance, which is identical to four Greek capital gamma letters (Γ) affixed to each other. If you think about it, it’s all really just a matter of perspective.

via viralnova

A flapper from the 1920s.
A flapper from the 1920s.
The Windsor Swastikas hockey team.
The Windsor Swastikas hockey team.
Kids dressed up for a Halloween party in 1918.
Kids dressed up for a Halloween party in 1918.
The 1908 San Francisco YMCA basketball team proudly displaying their swastikas.
Another team photo of the Edmonton Swastikas.
Team photo of the Edmonton Swastikas.
The 1909 Chilocco Indian Agricultural School basketball team.
The 1909 Chilocco Indian Agricultural School basketball team.
She's showing off her new boots, but what about that pattern on the tile floor?
She’s showing off her new boots, but what about that pattern on the tile floor?
Another photo of the Swastikas girls' hockey team from Edmonton, Canada, around 1916.
Another photo of the Swastikas girls’ hockey team from Edmonton, Canada, around 1916.
Swastika Laundry was a laundry company in Dublin, Ireland. This photo was taken in 1912. Notice the coincidence in the chosen colours.
Swastika Laundry was a laundry company in Dublin, Ireland. This photo was taken in 1912.

 

 

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